Career Center > Career Advising > Technology & Design

Technology & Design

Welcome to the tech & design community! Whether you are a creative genius or an all-star programmer, this community focuses on the implementation of skill-sets anchored in visual design, interactivity, technology, user experience, visual communication and creativity. Do you enjoy working with data, problem solving, and analytics? This community is for you! Do you enjoy communicating visually through various forms of artistic expression? Look no further! This community has YOU written all over it!

Meet the Tech & Design Career Community Team

You may wonder why you should join this community. Despite the fact that Lorne and Jameson are awesome (seriously - come see us in the Career Center; we are cool), this community connects a group of people who share a common interest in technology or design. We have staff, faculty, employers, and alumni who are eager to help you succeed. You will be able to develop and build professional skills with guidance from industry experts, alumni, and employers in your chosen field of interest. Our community emphasizes peer learning and shared knowledge to inspire excitement about career development and ideas of the future. We need innovators now more than ever, are you up for the challenge?

  • Career Advising

    Lorne

    Lorne Bobren, Career Advisor, lbobren@depaul.edu

    Make an Appointment

  • Employer Engagement

    Jameson

    Jameson Dixon
    Assistant Director, Employer Engagement
    jdixon26@depaul.edu

  • Let's Connect

    Schedule an appointment online in Handshake. You can search for Loop, Lincoln Park, and virtual or phone appointments.

    Schedule Appointment

    Drop-In Advising

    Thursdays, 1:00-4:00pm, CDM Building, 1st Floor Tutoring Center, Loop Campus

Industries & Career Areas

Areas of interest in this field range widely from graphic design, social media and web development to cybersecurity, software development and data science. Skills required to be successful in these areas include strong communication, project management, problem solving, writing skills, and creative thinking. As the world continues to change and technology continues to advance, there has never been a better time to explore the possibilities in this field.

Data Analytics

Data analytics is the process of examining data sets in order to draw conclusions about the information they contain, increasingly with the aid of specialized systems and software. Data analytics technologies and techniques are widely used in commercial industries to enable organizations to make more-informed business decisions and by scientists and researchers to verify or disprove scientific models, theories and hypotheses.

People interested in data and analysis are inquisitive, curious and creative. They can take abstract business issues and derive an analytical solution and share knowledge and clearly articulate insights to technical staff, management and decision makers. They can communicate to a diverse audience at multiple levels of the organization. In addition, they want to challenge existing best practices, explore new alternatives and introduce new initiatives.

Hard skills:

  • Programming languages such as R, Python, PHP, Ruby, Matlab, JAVA, C++, SQL, SAS, SPSS
  • Multivariate statistics - regression, principal components analysis and clustering
  • Data-driven predictive model development
  • Large Dataset experience using Teradata, Oracle or SQL
  • Business Intelligence tools including Business Objects, MicroStrategy and Tableau
  • Big Data technologies including Hadoop, MapReduce, Hive, Pig, Cassandra

Some sample job titles:

  • Systems Analyst
  • Business Analyst
  • Data Analyst
  • Business Intelligence Analyst
  • Health Informatics Analyst
  • Data Visualization Specialist

Data analytics is the process of examining data sets in order to draw conclusions about the information they contain, increasingly with the aid of specialized systems and software. Data analytics technologies and techniques are widely used in commercial industries to enable organizations to make more-informed business decisions and by scientists and researchers to verify or disprove scientific models, theories and hypotheses.

Design & UX

Your love of color, artistic eye and impeccable sense of style cause people to label you a creative person—and you wear that label well. It’s a label you embrace as you enjoy expressing your creativity and making things visually appealing. But what if we told you there was a way to exercise your creativity full time instead of just on the side? Better yet, what if you could get paid to be creative on a daily basis? The truth is there’s a wide array of creative careers where people just like you can thrive.

It should be no surprise that a successful designer is a creative thinker. As a designer you’ll also need to have strong communication skills, because you have to be able to communicate your ideas to others in order to sell them on your vision. Designers should be research-focused. Delivering quality design work is about more than just creativity—it’s also about context. You can’t design something with the proper context in mind for the audience if it's subject matter you are unfamiliar with or uninterested in. Designers should also be strong planners. Knowing the steps from beginning to end and being able to adapt them as needed for each situation is going to make your work more efficient and cause you less anxiety about deadlines. Being in a position to break down your process for a client or employer is also going to give them less anxiety as well. Additionally, successful designers need to be empathetic so that they can relate to their clients' problems.

Hard Skills:

  • Adobe Creative Suite (Photoshop, InDesign, Illustrator)
  • Web design (html, CSS, JavaScript...)
  • Typography
  • Color theory

Some sample job titles:

  • Graphic Designer
  • Web Designer
  • 3D Modeler
  • Compositor
  • Digital Media Strategist
  • UI/UX Designer
  • Game Designer
  • Information Architect
  • Interaction Designer

Your love of color, artistic eye and impeccable sense of style cause people to label you a creative person—and you wear that label well. It’s a label you embrace as you enjoy expressing your creativity and making things visually appealing. But what if we told you there was a way to exercise your creativity full time instead of just on the side? Better yet, what if you could get paid to be creative on a daily basis? The truth is there’s a wide array of creative careers where people just like you can thrive. 

Information Management

Information management is the collection and management of information from one or more sources and the distribution of that information to one or more audiences. This sometimes involves those who have a stake in, or a right to that information. The organizational structure must be capable of managing this information throughout the information lifecycle regardless of source or format (data, paper documents, electronic documents, audio, social business, video, etc.) for delivery through multiple channels that may include cell phones and web interfaces. Given these criteria, we can then say that the focus of IM is the ability of organizations to capture, manage, preserve, store and deliver the right information to the right people at the right time.

There is often a strong crossover in this field with areas outside of technology. People drawn to this area may have a strong interest in how technology fits into an organization's strategic plan. They may be less interested in things like writing code or setting up networks and more interested in bridging the communications gap between the technology team and other departments of a business. Strong communication is an essential skill, as well as the ability to speak and relate to different organizational departments. People interested in this area usually have a strong desire to manage projects and be “big picture” thinkers.

Hard skills:

  • Fundamental understanding of information technologies, including database programming, systems design, and networking, along with balanced views of their uses in business context
  • User and task analysis for interface development, prototyping, data flow and entity relationship diagramming
  • Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) implementation, Customer Relationship Management (CRM), Supply Chain Management (SCM), Content Management Systems (CMS)
  • IT auditing

Some sample job titles:

  • Data Administrator
  • Business Analyst
  • Systems Administrator
  • Network Architect
Info Management

Information management is the collection and management of information from one or more sources and the distribution of that information to one or more audiences. This sometimes involves those who have a stake in, or a right to that information. The organizational structure must be capable of managing this information throughout the information lifecycle regardless of source or format (data, paper documents, electronic documents, audio, social business, video, etc.) for delivery through multiple channels that may include cell phones and web interfaces. Given these criteria, we can then say that the focus of IM is the ability of organizations to capture, manage, preserve, store and deliver the right information to the right people at the right time.

Networking & Security

We live in an age of information. Now, with many devices communicating with each other over wired, wireless, or cellular networks, network security is an important concept. The term network security refers to protecting your digital assets (computer systems, programs, and information) from intrusion, destruction, theft, modification, or misuse. Network security can be made up of hardware devices, specialized software, physical security (i.e. locked computer rooms), and rules for people to follow. Just like securing your home, a network security system must protect against threats coming in from the outside and also deal with intruders if they make it inside.

People interested in IT networking and security are known for their complex problem-solving abilities and creative minds. You’ll be spending a fair amount of time working with an IT team, so employers will be looking for evidence of strong oral and communication skills. You'll need to break down complex concepts for all levels of an organization, so the ability to communicate clearly is essential. Additionally, a strong interest in big picture strategizing is important, as you may be asked to investigate industry best policy practices and incorporate them into your own company’s training and policies.

Hard skills include:

  • IDS/IPS, penetration and vulnerability testing
  • Firewall and intrusion detection/prevention protocols
  • Secure coding practices, ethical hacking and threat modeling
  • Windows, UNIX and Linux operating systems
  • Virtualization technologies
  • MySQL/MSSQL database platforms
  • Identity and access management principles
  • Application security and encryption technologies
  • Secure network architectures
  • Subnetting, DNS, encryption technologies and standards, VPNs, VLANs, VoIP and other network routing methods
  • Network and web related protocols (e.g., TCP/IP, UDP, IPSEC, HTTP, HTTPS, routing protocols, etc.)
  • Advanced Persistent Threats (APT), phishing and social engineering, network access controllers (NAC), gateway anti-malware and enhanced authentication

Some sample job titles:

  • Network Security Administrator
  • Web Developer
  • Computer Forensics Analyst
  • Information Security Engineer
security

The term network security refers to protecting your digital assets (computer systems, programs, and information) from intrusion, destruction, theft, modification, or misuse. Network security can be made up of hardware devices, specialized software, physical security (i.e. locked computer rooms), and rules for people to follow. Just like securing your home, a network security system must protect against threats from the outside and deal with intruders if they make it inside. 

Web, App and Software Development

Developers are at the forefront of the digital age. The websites we browse, the gifts we order and the news we peruse online are all made possible by the developers who design, build and implement websites, applications and software. They are heavily involved in website and app creation, from helping design aesthetic properties such as layout and color, to technical considerations such as how to design a website to handle a given amount of Internet traffic. Some of the responsibilities of a programmer include reviewing programs on a frequent basis and make adjustments as are necessary to ensure proper working of the program, confirming program operation by conducting tests; modifying program sequence and/or codes, and create and publish technical diagrams to support coding efforts.

The people most successful in this field typically have a strong attention to detail, love to problem solve and have a solid aptitude and interest in learning new languages and technologies. They like to approach problems creatively and get a strong sense of accomplishment from troubleshooting a frustrating issue. In addition, they need to work well in a team environment, as most projects are developed collaboratively.

Hard skills:

  • Java, JavaScript, Python, C#, C++, PHP… (We are just listing some of the most common coding languages, but there are many many more! You should be fluent in at least one of the languages listed.)

Some sample job titles:

  • Software Developer
  • Application Developer
  • Front End Developer
web dev

Developers are at the forefront of the digital age. The websites we browse, the gifts we order and the news we peruse online are all made possible by the developers who design, build and implement websites, applications and software. They are heavily involved in website and app creation, from helping design aesthetic properties such as layout and color, to technical considerations such as how to design a website to handle a given amount of Internet traffic.

Student Organizations

Below is a short list of student organizations you may wish to explore or join. Browse a complete list of DePaul student organizations by logging into OrgSync.

Professional Organizations