The Struggle of Dorm Life

dormUnless you’re a commuter or happen to know someone in the city that’ll let you stay at their place, odds are you’ll live in a dorm your freshman year of college. For some, this will be quite an adjustment, especially if you had a room to yourself back at home such as myself. Before college, the thought of being assigned three random strangers to be living in close quarters terrified me. Fortunately, my roommates were not extreme so I did not have to drastically alter my habits, although I did have to adjust to turning the television off at 11:00 pm.

My dorm arrangement was a quad consisting of two sets of bunk beds with myself being on top. The benefits of being the top is that you feel less confined, especially if you live in Seton ​where the ceilings are high. The drawbacks are that the temperature up there is a toasty twenty degrees different than your lower bunk counterpart, and having to climb a ladder every time you want to get to and from your bed, and that you’ll need some time to overcome the fear that you’ll roll over right off the top bunk.

Privacy, there is none. With three roommates, a communal style bathroom and shower room, the only time I could ever feel alone was at the library’s ​third floor, a.k.a. the quiet study floor. As for eating, my diet primarily consisted of what the Student Center has to offer due to the meal plan, however, it would also be fairly difficult to maintain home cookware for the dorms since the only stove is in the lounge and there is minimal storage for pots, pans, and dishware. When I look back to freshman year as opposed to my current situation where I have my own room, I wonder how I was ever able to live in such conditions. Yet, I kind of miss those days. Those were times of meeting the new people that lived all around me and immersing myself in a new city that I would call home. The struggle of dorm life was not so much a struggle after all, but rather a humbling experience that propelled me into the college experience I yearned for.