• Donna Kiel
    College of Education

    2016 – $5,000 from the Precious Blood Ministry for the project, “STEAM Innovators.” The Office of Innovative Professional Learning in COE will provide an educational program focused on three goals: creation of interest in, and a pathway, for future education; development of interest in STEAM-related careers; and creation of a structure and system for community involvement in STEAM-related learning.
  • Sioban Albiol
    College of Law

    2016 – $10,000 from the Illinois Equal Justice Foundation for the project, “Legal Information for the Public.” Funds awarded will support efforts by DePaul's Asylum & Immigration Law Clinic to deliver legal information on rights and remedies at trusted community sites to low-income immigrants and refugees throughout Illinois.
  • Donna Kiel
    College of Education

    2016 – $6,000 from MindXplorer (Beijing) Education and Culture Exchange Co., Ltd. for a “Student Centered Learning Training Program.” The COE’s Office of Innovative Professional Learning will provide a one-week professional training program in student-centered learning for teachers in Beijing China.
  • Carolyn Narasimhan
    College of Science & Health

    2016 – $9,208 from the Chicago Community Trust, via a subaward from the University of Chicago, for “Chicago STEM Education Consortium.” DePaul will contribute to program coordination, center marketing, policy development and consulting services.
  • Nichole Pinkard
    College of Computing and Digital Media

    2016 – $150,000 from the Best Buy Foundation to support the scaling of Mobile Digital Hubs. The original hub, implemented in Chicago in 2015, connected approximately 2500 youth and families in 10 neighborhoods. This project will build on the best practices gained in Chicago to develop the mobile hub model in Chicago, Dallas and another mutually identified city.
  • Maria Taveras DeMoya
    College of Communication

    2016 – $35,000 from the McCormick Tribune Foundation for the “Pasos al Futuro Program 2016” designed for students from Latino-predominant Chicago area schools who have a strong interest in journalism. This program gives them the opportunity not only to develop their technical skills, but also to ground themselves in the importance of good journalism in a healthy democracy.
  • Gayle Mindes
    College of Education

    2016 – $49,961 from the Chicago Department of Family and Support Services for “Professional Development for Early Childhood Teachers, Teacher Assistants, and Family Service Personnel.” DePaul University will offer credit courses to Head Start staff selected by the Department of Family Support Services (DFSS).
  • Donna Kiel
    College of Education

    2016 – $3,500 from the Guerin College Preparatory High School for a collaborative project in which the Office of Innovative Professional Learning will offer consultation, professional development and mentoring to the prep school’s faculty, staff and administrators.
  • Donna Kiel
    College of Education

    2016 – $1,500 from the Catholic Theological Union for the “Curriculum Revision Project.” The Office of Innovative Professional Learning will engage the administration and faculty of the Catholic Theological Union (CTU) in an initial three-step process of professional development and mentoring in support of the CTU’s efforts to restructure and revitalize its curriculum and programs.
  • Donna Kiel
    College of Education

    2016 – $32,000 from MindXplorer (Beijing) Education and Culture Exchange Co. for two teacher training courses, "Student Centered Learning" and "Engaging Students through Reflective Practice," to be taught in April 2016.
  • Barbara Radner
    School of New Learning

    2016 – $200,000 from the Polk Brothers Foundation for the “Full Service Community School Collaboration.” This project will support CPS Community Schools in partnerships with agencies that provide extended day programs and parent education. Through collaborative forums, principals and agency leaders will learn strategies and resources that they can apply to their own organizations’ progress.
  • Christie Klimas
    College of Science & Health

    2016 – $7,854 from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, via a subaward from the Morton Arboretum, for the development of new tools and maps that identify communities underserved by urban forest green infrastructure, evaluate resilience under future scenarios, and optimize management strategies to mitigate disparities and risks.
  • Megan Heffernan
    College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences

    2016 – $50,000 from the Folger Institute for the project, “Willing Minds: Gathered Writing, Materials Epistemology, and the Early Modern Poetic Imagination.” This project recovers the formal dimensions of handpress-era books by tracing the development of the poetry collection in early modern England.
  • Charles Wurtzebach
    Driehaus College of Business

    2016 – $63,637 from the Local Initiatives Support Corporation for the project, “Micro Market Recovery Program Extension.” DePaul's Institute of Housing Studies will develop reports that advance the work of the MMRP, which mitigates the effects of Illinois' foreclosure crisis by providing housing counseling services, supporting mortgage acquisition or restructuring, investing in destabilized neighborhoods, and providing expertise to groups working to revitalize neighborhoods.
  • Joseph Tariman
    College of Science & Health

    2016 – $10,000 from the Jonas Center for Nursing and Veterans Healthcare for the “DNP Jonas Nurse Leader Scholar” scholarship to support doctoral nursing students pursuing both PhD and DNP degrees, thereby increasing both the number of faculty available to teach in nursing schools nationwide and the number of advanced practice nurses providing direct patient care.
  • Jane Huang
    College of Computing and Digital Media

    2016 – $96,182 from Carnegie Mellon University for the “Evaluation of Threat Modeling Methods for Software Requirements Engineering.” The goal of this project is to investigate and answer the research question: How can the suitability of candidate Threat Modeling Methods (TMMs) be usefully and objectively evaluated for a given context?
  • Jalene LaMontagne
    College of Science & Health

    2016 – $2,000 from the Huron Mountain Wildlife Foundation for the project, “Mast-seeding Dynamics in the Southern Range of Boreal Forest Species.” Mast seeding is the synchronous and highly variable production of seed crops by a plant population. The project’s goal is to understand the causes and consequences of individual variation in seed and the influence of climate change on white spruce.
  • Lynn Narasimhan
    College of Science & Health

    2016 – $5,980 from the Mathematical Association of American for “Expanding the Math Circles of Chicago in High Need Areas.” This award will enable the Math Circles of Chicago to intensify its outreach to motivated students in two high-needs areas of Chicago: Bridgeport and Pilsen.
  • Christopher Drupieski
    College of Science & Health

    2016 – $35,000 from the Simons Foundation for the research project, “Cohomology and Support Varieties,” which focuses on the representation theory and cohomology of algebraic (super) groups, Lie (super) algebras, finite (super) group schemes, and related algebraic structures.
  • Kimberly Quinn
    College of Science & Health

    2016 – $1,500 from the Society for Personality and Social Psychology for the research project, “Physical Environment Connectedness and Wellbeing.” Self-other connectedness promotes a variety of positive outcomes, but what happens when the "other" is the physical environment? This experiment will test the hypothesis that while walking and listening to music, participants who attend to the physical environment will show a relatively greater sense of place and higher well-being.
  • Donna Kiel
    College of Education

    2016 – $40,000 from the China Education and Research Network (CERNET) for “STEM Math and Science Professional Development.” CERNET has engaged the Office of Innovative Professional Learning to facilitate a STEM teacher training program in Beijing, China from June 12, 2016 through June 23, 2016.
  • Donna Kiel
    College of Education

    2016 – $3,000 from the Chicago Board of Education for “Professional Development for Sarah E. Goode STEM Academy.” The objectives of this project include deepening faculty skill and practice in utilizing Understanding by Design (UbD) as a curriculum development resource, and the coaching/mentoring of teachers in applying UbD, growth mindset practices, and mindfulness integration to instruction.
  • Orson Morrison
    College of Science & Health

    2016 – $2,300 from Fourth Presbyterian Chicago Lights-Summer Day for the implementation of a “Social Emotional Learning Curriculum” which will allow students to learn and practice appropriate social-emotional skills. Teachers and staff will have resources and curricula to support their students' successful coping and conflict resolution, which will in turn lead to improved behavior and learning in the classroom.
  • Neil Vincent
    College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences

    2016 – $18,740 from the U.S. Department of Education, via a subaward from Chicago State University, for an “Evaluation of the Community Impact of the Center for Urban/Rural Agriculture Ecology and Alternative Energy.” DePaul will conduct a summative evaluation of the impact of the Center on Chicago State community partners.
  • Christopher Einolf
    College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences

    2016 – $42,898 from Indiana University for the project, “Gender-Based Interviews and Field Experiments on Upgrading Donors.” This research project will study how spouses communicate and make decisions about increasing donations. The project will test hypotheses using field experiments not limited to direct mail solicitation and will make gender a prominent variable throughout the research.
  • Douglas Bruce
    College of Science & Health

    2016 – $168,845 from the National Institutes of Health for the project, “Motives for Heavy Cannabis Use among Young Men who have Sex with Men Living with HIV/AIDS.” The degree to which HIV-related stressors may drive heavy cannabis use among this population is not well defined. An ecological approach will assess individual, interpersonal, community-level, and societal factors associated with cannabis use among this group and estimate associations between heavy use and a range of HIV care continuum outcomes.
  • Nell Cobb
    College of Education

    2016 – $20,000 from Motorola Solutions for the project, “InSTEM Girls 2016.” The Inspiring STEM in Girls program (InSTEM), offered by DePaul University's College of Education since 2014, addresses a need for middle school girls from backgrounds underrepresented in STEM disciplines to engage in collaborative project-based experiences. The assessing of collaborative problem-solving for students is supported by PISA (Programme for International Student Assessment), which highlighted the importance of cultivating a "habit of mind."
  • Sioban Albiol
    College of Law

    2016 – $13,000 from the Chicago Community Trust for the “Illinois Funders Collaborative-DACA Relief Initiative.” DePaul's Asylum and Immigration Law Clinic will provide DACA-related services to its 26 community partners, including advice and consultation on complex cases, roundtables for information sharing and case resolution, staff training, and community education presentations. "Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) is an immigration policy that allows certain undocumented immigrants to receive a renewable two-year work permit and exemption from deportation.
  • Sioban Albiol
    College of Law

    2016 – $65,000 from the Polk Bros. Foundation for the “Legal Resources Project for Immigration Service Providers,” which will provide legal assistance, education, and resources to help 25 Chicago-area, community-based, immigrant-serving organizations meet their legal assistance needs. Support will include telephone counseling, legal research in complex cases, factual investigation to resolve legal issues, and accredited training on immigration issues.
  • to Carolyn Narasimhan
    College of Science & Health

    2016 – $100,000 from the CME Group Foundation for an “Elementary Math Specialist Pilot.” DePaul University, in partnership with the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) and the University of Chicago, will finalize the development of the Math Specialist Program and pilot the introductory course with CPS elementary teachers. The Math Specialist Program is designed to provide elementary school teachers with the knowledge, confidence, and tools for teaching mathematics to young children.
  • John Shanahan
    College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences

    2016 – $74,271 from the National Endowment for the Humanities for “Reading Chicago Reading: Modeling Texts and Readers in a Public Library System.” This project aims to put new data-intensive predictive tools in the hands of public librarians and digital humanities scholars in order to enhance their ability to serve public needs and interests. It takes as its starting point the Chicago Public Library's popular and much imitated "One Book One Chicago" program, in which books are annually selected for city-wide promotion. The project combines circulation data, social media postings, text analysis, branch-by-branch demographics, and history of the events themselves to recover quantitative, predictive factors that link texts to reader response.
  • Donald Opitz
    School for New Learning

    2016 – $15,974 from the National Science Foundation for the project, “Science and Power, Science as Power: International Conference Travel.” This project will enable ten U.S. science studies scholars to participate in the 7th International Conference of the European Society for the History of Science to be held in Prague, Czech Republic, in September 2016.
  • Howard Rosing
    Steans Center

    2016 – $10,480 from the National Institutes of Health, via a subaward from the Illinois Institute of Technology, for the project, “Promoting Healthy Lifestyle Behaviors to Address Obesity Related Complications of African Americans.” Lending his expertise in community-based research and urban food access, Rosing will participate in meetings with the project's consumer advisory board, consult with the peer navigators, and work with the research team on data analyses related to food access, diet, and economic indicators.
  • James Riely and Radhakrishnan Jagadeesan
    College of Computing and Digital Media

    2016 – $499,577 from the National Science Foundation for the project, “Relaxing Soundness.” In globally distributed databases, replication is used to achieve scalability and availability; it's also increasingly used with computers, smartphones, and even watches. But with replication can come a conflict between consistency and performance. Weaker notions of "correctness" can improve performance, but the programming model is more complicated. This project is an investigation of whether a simplified model can still maintain the benefits of weak correctness.
  • Harold Welsch
    Driehaus College of Business

    2016 – $25,000 from the Coleman Foundation for the 2016-17 Coleman Foundation Faculty Entrepreneurship Fellows Program, which is designed to reach out beyond the business school to find faculty who will champion entrepreneurship in their respective disciplines. This grant award will enable DePaul University to expand its base of entrepreneurship to four allied academic fields.
  • Tracey Lewis-Elligan
    College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences

    2016 – $18,658 from the U.S. Department of Education, via a subaward from Chicago State University, for the project, “Evaluation of the Educational Impact of the Center for Urban/Rural Agriculture Ecology and Alternative Energy.” DePaul University will conduct a summative evaluation of Center programs focused on Chicago State faculty, staff, and student participants to determine whether the project effectively met the grant goals and objectives.
  • Nichole Pinkard
    College of Computing and Digital Media

    2016 – $1,216,130 from World Business Chicago for STEAMuseum, a project that involves virtual exchanges between high school youth in Chicago and Casablanca. Six schools or organizations (three in Chicago and three in Casablanca) will engage in the project per semester. Eventually, at least 240 youth will participate. DePaul, through its Digital Youth Network, will provide and manage the digital platforms for the asynchronous virtual exchange experience; direct the updating of the software; provide training on the use of the two platforms; and help develop the digital curriculum.
  • Barbara Bressler
    College of Law

    2016 – $25,000 from the Illinois Bar Foundation to employ a recent DePaul law graduate as a clinical fellow for the Poverty Law Clinic for one year. The addition of a fellow will increase the number of cases the clinic can handle; this will, in turn, provide DePaul law students who participate in the clinic with even more real-life cases from which to draw personal and professional lessons.
  • Donna Kiel
    College of Education

    2016 – $10,000 from MindXplorer for “Student Centered Learning Exploration: A Collaborative Two-Part Experience.” Through the Office of Innovative Professional Learning, COE will continue a collaboration with MindXplorer by facilitating a connection with the faculty of #18 Middle School in Beijing, China. A four-step process will continue the skill building of the teachers in Beijing with a focus on student-centered learning.
  • John Zeigler
    Steans Center for Community-Based Service Learning

    2016 – $173,500 from Get IN Chicago for “Community Collaboration and Resident Empowerment (CCRE) Technical Assistance.” DePaul will help four lead agencies in creating an organizational needs assessment, developing community action plans, and establishing/managing a community planning committee.
  • Alexander Rasin
    College of Computing and Digital Media

    2016 – $77,689 from the National Science Foundation, via a subaward from the University of Notre Dame, for the project, “Asked and Answered: Intelligent Data Science for Software Projects.” Rasin and a student will be responsible for investigating, developing, and validating the Query Engine and deployment optimizations for this research project.
  • Doris Rusch
    College of Computing and Digital Media

    2016 – $10,000 from Centerstone Research Institute for collaboration on the empathy sections of Centerstone’s positive psychology framework. This will include designing empathy game ideas using an analog format. Activities will include conducting a February 2016 workshop at DePaul, a software support/feasibility assessment, and positive psychology framework development.
  • Nichole Pinkard
    College of Computing and Digital Media

    2016 – $475,000 from the MacArthur Foundation for the project, “DYN Bronzeville Community STEAM Initiative,” which will focus on creating urban communities that nurture STEAM identities in youth.
  • Joseph Schwieterman
    College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences

    2016 – $3,700 from the Institute for Humane Studies for the project, “Permissionless Innovation.” A panel of speakers will explore how Airbnb and similar firms are revolutionizing travel with virtually no coordination with government agencies, and transforming real estate development and the tourism industry in ways planners could not have predicted.
  • John Zeigler
    Steans Center for Community-Based Service Learning

    2016 – $64,350 from Jumpstart for Young Children, Inc. for DePaul's Jumpstart program, which trains students to deliver an innovative early education program via yearlong one-on-one relationships with preschool children from low-income households.
  • Elizabeth LeClair
    College of Science & Health

    2016 – $443,089 from the National Institutes of Health for “Follow That Cell: Motility Analysis of L-Plastin Mutant Zebrafish,” a study of the genetics of cell motility by experimentally manipulating in zebrafish a key component of the cytoskeleton: the actin-bundling protein L-plastin. Because cell motility is a common aspect of both health and disease, how cells regulate movement is an important issue.
  • Steven Lytinen
    College of Computing and Digital Media

    2016 – $299,650 from the U.S. Department of Education for “Graduate Assistance in Areas of National Need,” which will provide funding for four Ph.D. student fellowships. These scholarships will further the goals of the GAANN program by enabling DePaul to recruit and retain outstanding students, especially those from underrepresented groups. The overall goal is to help maintain the competitiveness and continued preeminence of the US in computer science.
  • Nichole Pinkard
    College of Computing and Digital Media

    2016 – $213,273 from the National Science Foundation for “Smart and Connected Communities: Reducing the Friction in the L3 Connects Infrastructure through the Integration of SMART Technologies.” This project is aimed at enabling a connected city where youth and organizations are closely linked to support diverse learning pathways for students. DePaul will take the lead in designing and implementing the smart communities infrastructure to track real-time participation and develop the student and adult facing mobile apps.
  • Nichole Pinkard
    College of Computing and Digital Media

    2016 – $299,650 from the National Science Foundation for “Partnerships for Urban STEM Learning Hubs.” This project will build on the Digital Youth Network's history of collaborating with community, civic, and academic partners in the design of urban STEAM learning ecosystems.
  • Donna Kiel
    College of Education

    2016 – $9,000 from Rush University for “Rush University Academic Writing Workshop.” DePaul's Office of Innovative Professional Learning will provide up to 28 graduate students in Rush's Nursing Science Program with an online comprehensive, accessible, individualized writing program to support successful academic writing.
  • Donna Kiel
    College of Education

    2016 – $3,000 from Pritzker College Preparatory High School for “Professional Development Workshops and Mentoring.” DePaul faculty will provide onsite workshops, focused on Inquiry-based Teaching and Learning strategies, as well as mentoring for Pritzker faculty.
  • Doris Rusch
    College of Computing and Digital Media

    2016 – $17,600 from the Centerstone Research Institute for an initiative that will support the development of the Matrix Project, a research study to explore why and how games can promote learning and positive youth development.
  • Nichole Pinkard
    College of Computing and Digital Media

    2016 – $34,999 from the National Science Foundation, via a subaward from the University of Washington, for “Mobile City Science: Youth Mapping Community Learning Opportunities.” DePaul's Digital Youth Network will offer a three-week camp for 15-20 young people who will use GIS tools to map learning opportunities in the Washington Park neighborhood. Post-camp, Pinkard will help analyze outcomes and use the data to inform the design of STEM programming in the community.
  • Barbara Radner
    School for New Learning

    2016 – $7,000 from the Children First Fund for “Professional Development at William Finkl Academy.” Under Radner’s direction, the Center for Urban Education will support effective instruction and formative assessment aligned with REACH, PARCC, and Common Core standards.
  • Carolyn Narasimhan
    College of Science & Health

    2016 – $18,000 from the National Science Foundation, via a subaward from Chicago State, for the “Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation 2016-17.” The alliance helps colleges and universities transform education in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). This award provides research and professional development opportunities to a number of DePaul STEM undergraduates.
  • Joseph Schwieterman
    College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences

    2016 – $3,700 from the Institute of Human Studies for the project, “Permissionless Innovation.” A panel will explore how Airbnb and similar firms are revolutionizing travel, with virtually no coordination with government agencies, and transforming real estate development and the tourism industry in ways planners could not have predicted.
  • Nichole Pinkard
    College of Computing and Digital Media

    2015 – $3,500,000 from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation for Stewardship of COL and Chicago City of Learning 2015. This award will enable the Digital Youth Network at DePaul to support and scale up the Cities of Learning, a suite of infrastructure items designed to make visible and connect the city's learning resources. A driving goal is to provide cities and national leaders the ability to understand the patterns of youth participation in a learning ecosystem.
  • Sarah Read
    College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences

    2015 – $5,760 from the National Council of Teachers of English for the study, "Surveying the Status of the Multi-major Professional Writing Course in U.S. Institutions of Higher Education." This study investigates the status of a course that exists in a wide range of forms in many, if not most, post-secondary settings.
  • Sioban Albiol
    Law

    2015 – $350,000 from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation for "Illinois Immigration Legal Services Capacity Building." In partnership with the Catholic Legal Immigration Network (CLINIC), the Asylum and Immigration Law Clinic will develop the ability within four-to-six community-based organizations to provide immigration legal services in geographic areas of unmet need.
  • Liam Heneghan
    College of Science and Health

    2015 – $4,000 from the National Science Foundation (via a subaward from Purdue University) for the project, "A Global Sustainable Soundscapes Network." A series of recordings will be taken from along Chicago's iconic lakeshore, especially in areas that are set aside for nature conservation or that are undergoing ecological restoration.
  • Donna Kiel
    College of Education

    2015 – $5,000 from the Office of Catholic Schools for the project, "Providing Consultation and Professional Development to the Faculty of St. Francis de Sales High School." This initiative will engage the school’s faculty and administration in redefining and reinvigorating the school culture in a way that clearly puts the mission of student learning and success front-and-center.
  • Beth Lawrence
    College of Science and Health

    2015 – $23,447 from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (via a subaward from Loyola University) for "Furthering Capacity to Maintain High Quality Coastal Wetlands in Northern Michigan," supporting the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative and the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement by removing invasive plant species from 355 acres of ecologically-critical marsh and meadow.
  • Lynn Narasimhan
    College of Science and Health

    2015 – $700,000 from the Chicago Community Trust for “CPS / DePaul Network Partnership: Year 4,” a continuing, coordinated effort with the Department of Mathematics and Science of the Chicago Public Schools (CPS) to build and extend capacity to implement the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics in networks, schools, and classrooms.
  • Barbara Radner
    School for New Learning

    2015 – $200,000 from the Polk Brothers Foundation for the project, “Chicago Literacies,” which will build on the progress of Chicago Problem Solvers, a year-long development of school capacity that has emphasized responding strategically to problems in the classroom, in the school, and in the system. The initiative will reach all Chicago schools through its website and collaborations with central office-based literacy development.
  • Stephanie Whitney
    College of Education

    2015 – $15,000 from the McDougal Family Foundation for the project, “Implementing and Sustaining Lesson Study in Chicago Public Schools,” which will study school communities engaging in lesson study as a form of professional development to better understand how schools implement lesson study and how educators new to the process grow in their understanding of lesson study.
  • Charles Wurtzebach
    Dreihaus College of Business

    2015 – $12,501 from New York University for the project, “Availability of Financing for Small, Privately-Owned Multifamily Rental Properties.” DePaul's Institute for Housing Studies will produce a set of data tables on the multifamily housing stock and multifamily lending trends in Cook County, Illinois. These data will be aggregated at the 2010 census tract level and will be broken out annually and grouped separately by building unit count and by building age.
  • Sybil Madison-Boyd
    College of Computing and Digital Media

    2015 – $240,000 from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation for the “Disconnected Youth Digital Learning” pilot program, which will offer self-driven education to youth incarcerated in two Illinois facilities. Through the use of tablet computers, they will be able access resources at their own pace, engage in social activities during unstructured times, and participate in Digital Youth Network and other Learning programs.
  • Andrew Carroll
    College of Science and Health

    2015 – $30,000 from the National Science Foundation for the International Conference on Representation Theory and Commutative Algebra, which will enable scholars to share progress made in diverse, related fields. By exposing cutting-edge methods, the event hopes to attract a new crop of junior researchers to the field.
  • Jane Huang
    College of Computing and Digital Media

    2015 – $7,500 from the National Science Foundation to enable up to five Ph.D. students enrolled in U.S. universities to attend the 23rd International Requirements Engineering Conference in Ottawa, Canada August 24-28, 2015.
  • Leonard Jason
    College of Science and Health

    2015 – $632,344 (first year of five) from the National Institutes of Health for the project, “Emergent Social Environments as Predictors of Recovery Resident Outcomes,” which will help researchers better understand how a sober living experience prolongs abstinence, how social dynamics affect outcomes, and which elements are critical/optional. The research will help identify who benefits most and least from such care.
  • Jalene LaMontagne
    College of Science and Health

    2015 – $2,135 from the Huron Mountain Wildlife Foundation for the project, “Mast-Seeding Dynamics in the Southern Range of a Boreal Forest Species,” whose goal is to make clear the causes/consequences of variation in seed production on the population phenomenon of mast-seeding, as well as to trace the influence of climate change on white spruce seed production.
  • Donald Opitz
    School for New Learning

    2015 – $15,876 from the National Science Foundation to support participation of U.S. scholars in the conference, "Gendering Science: Women and Men Producing Knowledge," in Prague, Czech Republic. All seven participants and the principal investigator will present in sessions at the conference, which is organized to promote Science & Technology Studies scholarship on gender and science internationally.
  • Harold Welsch
    Driehaus College of Business

    2015 – $28,000 from the Coleman Foundation for the 2015-16 Coleman Foundation Faculty Entrepreneurship Fellows Program, which reaches out beyond the business school to find faculty who will champion entrepreneurship in their respective disciplines. This award will enable DePaul University to expand its base of entrepreneurship to four allied academic fields.
  • Sioban Albiol
    DePaul Asylum & Immigration Clinic, College of Law

    2015 – $65,000 from the Polk Brothers Foundation for the Asylum & Immigration Clinic Legal Resource Project 2016, which will enable the clinic to build on its Legal Resource Project (LRP) in the interest of serving low-income immigrants and refugees in Chicago. The LRP currently partners with 26 community-based organizations serving indigent immigrants and refugees throughout Illinois.
  • Molly Andolina and Hilary Conklin
    College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences and the College of Education

    2015 – $25,000 from the Brinson Foundation for “Fostering student voice: A case study of the impact of participatory civic education on secondary students' literacy and civic skills.” Using classroom observations, surveys, focus groups, interviews and student work, this project will use a case-study approach to investigate educational programming aimed at narrowing the civic opportunity gap.
  • Jane Huang
    College of Computing and Digital Media

    2015 – $444,326 from the National Science Foundation for the project, “Advanced Traceability for Composing Product Line Safety Cases,” whose goal is to enable the safe reuse of safety analysis artifacts such as fault-trees, FMECAs (failure mode, effects and criticality analyses), and safety cases across a product line. This work will result in rigorous and safe processes for systematic reuse of safety-related artifacts, including the ability to compose safety-cases from existing domain-level assets.
  • Jane Huang
    College of Computing and Digital Media

    2015 – $249,973 from the National Science Foundation for the project, “TraceLab Community Infrastructure for Replication, Collaboration, and Innovation,” which seeks to develop an experimental workbench for designing, constructing and executing traceability experiments, and for facilitating the rigorous evaluation of different traceability techniques. This new research project will use TraceLab to reproduce a significant selection of landmark experiments in traceability, thereby providing a baseline against which future work can be evaluated.
  • Joseph Mikels
    College of Science and Health

    2015 – $589,432 from the National Science Foundation for the project, “The Role of Affect in Decisions Involving Risk across the Adult Life Span.” Though decision-making is traditionally considered a critical cognitive endeavor, recent theory and research underscore the role of emotion (affect), especailly in decisions that involve risk. This project presents a framework that integrates the disparate influences of affect on such decisions.
  • Orson Morrison
    Family & Community Services, College of Science and Health

    2015 – $2,300 from the Fourth Presbyterian Chicago Lights Summer Day for “Social Emotional Learning Curriculum and Consultation.” Services will include development of a tailored curriculum for Summer Day students, staff training and weekly consultations with staff to support implementation.
  • Carolyn Narasimhan
    STEM Center, College of Science and Health

    2015 – $275,000 from the Chicago Community Trust for the DePaul/CPS Science Partnership (Year 3). The STEM Center will partner with the Chicago Public Schools to develop programming for educators in support of the Common Core Standards in Science. A main goal of the STEM Center is to develop and support math and science programs for K-12 teachers throughout Chicago.
  • Thomas Kyle Petersen
    College of Science and Health

    2015 – $35,000 from the Simons Foundation for the project, “Algebraic, Geometric, and Enumerative Combinatorics.” The grants is intended to stimulate collaboration in the field, primarily through the funding of travel and related expenditures. This collaborative project will focus on 1) face enumeration in combinatorial topology, 2) enumerative combinatorics of Coxeter groups, and 3) affine hyperplane arrangements and descent algebras.
  • Nichole Pinkard
    College of Computing and Digital Media

    2015 – $323,528 from Mac Services Inc II for “Support of the Cities of Learning 1.0 Platform.” DePaul, through its Digital Youth Network, will provide a consulting team to Mac Services for the support and maintenance of the Cities of Learning 1.0 platform for the four cities participating: Chicago, Dallas, Pittsburgh, and Washington, D.C. ThoughtWorks, a software company focused on software design and delivery, will assist DePaul with this initiative.
  • Marcy Dinius
    College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences

    2015 – $50,400 from the National Endowment for the Humanities for “African American Abolitionist David Walker's 'Appeal' (1829) and Antebellum American Print Culture,” a study that extends questions about generative authorship and intertextuality in political writing (pamphlets and newspapers), legal writing (government documents) and other formats.
  • Rajul Jain
    College of Communication

    2015 – $1,550 from the Arthur W. Page Center at The Pennsylvania State University for the project, “Distinguishing ‘Real’ from ‘Fake’: How Consumers Evaluate Authenticity of Corporate Social Responsibility Programs and What It Means for the Bottom Line.”
  • Morag Kersel
    College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences

    2015 – $20,000 from the University of Chicago for the project, “The Past for Sale: New Approaches to the Study of Archaeological Looting.” As a visiting fellow at the Neubauer Collegium for Culture and Society, Kersel will participate in a three-year, interdisciplinary study of the global, illicit trafficking of antiquities, from illegal excavation to the point of purchase.
  • Carolyn Narasimhan
    STEM Center, College of Science and Health

    2015 – $500,000 from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation for the project, Leading with Algebra, a partnership with the Chicago Public Schools to support the implementation of the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics in grades 6-8.
  • Brian Spittle
    Enrollment Management & Marketing

    2015 – $270,348 over five years from the United States Department of Education for DePaul University Student Support Services designed to improve the graduation rate for eligible low-income and first-generation students, as well as for those with disabilities. Two hundred eligible students will be served each year.
  • Gregory Brewster
    College of Computing and Digital Media

    2015 – $6,655 from Vertical Data, LLC for the project, “Auto-Categorization Techniques” whose goal is the use of artificial intelligence algorithms to identify and implement automatic categorization techniques for business data.
  • Orson Morrison
    Family & Community Services, College of Science & Health

    2015 – $4,500 from the Chicago Board of Education for consultation services for Manierre Elementary School. Family and Community Services will provide social, emotional, and behavioral interventions to students.
  • Sioban Albiol
    College of Law

    2015 – $7,533 from the Chicago Community Trust for the Illinois Funders DACA Relief Initiative. With this support, DePaul’s Asylum and Immigration Law Clinic will provide a wide range of services to its 26 community partners. (DACA stands for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals immigration policy).
  • Suzanne Bell
    College of Science & Health

    2015 – $6,837 from the National Aeronautics & Space Administration, via a subaward from Northwestern University, for the project, “CREWS: Crew Recommender for Effective Work in Space,” whose research aims are to identify the effects of team composition on team functioning in long-distance space exploration, along with the critical factors of team composition driving this effect; to investigate particular patterns of this effect with different team compositions; and to identify methods for composing teams.
  • Nathan Matteson
    College of Computing and Digital Media

    2015 – $22,216 from the National Science Foundation, via a subaward from the University of Chicago, for the project, “Center for Robust Decision-making on Climate and Energy." The center brings together experts from a broad range of disciplines to improve the computational models needed to evaluate climate and energy policies and to make robust decisions based on outcomes. DePaul will build web-based applications that provide outreach support for the Center’s research and educational programs.
  • Bernard Beck-Winchatz
    College of Science & Health

    2015 – $69,500 from the Illinois Space Grant Consortium at the University of Illinois for two new NASA-based STEM courses: one using small multi-rotor model helicopters and another for middle school teachers.
  • Donna Kiel
    College of Education

    2015 – $2,500 from Fluid Content, Inc. for the project, “STEAM Curriculum Development,” which uses science fiction, art, and transmedia to teach STEAM concepts.
  • Orson Morrison
    Family & Community Services, College of Science & Health

    2015 – $35,775 from the Chicago Board of Education to provide social, emotional and behavioral interventions within four Chicago public schools: McAuliffe Elementary, Lincoln Park High School, and two assigned schools within network four.
  • Paul Vadola
    College of Science & Health

    2015 – $55,000 from the American Chemical Society for the project, “New Methods for the Synthesis of Spirocycles via Lewis Acid Catalyzed Dearomative Arene Alkyne Coupling.” Including students as researchers, the project will focus on the construction of C-C bonds, which lies at the heart of organic synthesis. Specifically, the project will investigate the spirocyclization of new alkynyl arenes substrate classes, as well as the catalytic spirocyclization mechanism through computational studies and isotope-labeling experiments, with an emphasis on elucidating the critical role of water in the reaction.
  • Carolyn Narasimhan
    College of Science & Health

    2015 – $31,000 from the Chicago Community Trust, via a subaward from the University of Chicago, for the “Illinois Elementary Math Specialist Project.” The University of Chicago Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education, the UIC Learning Science Research Institute, and DePaul University will collaborate on a planning grant to develop a framework for a program intended to increase the mathematical knowledge and pedagogical skills of teachers in grades three to five, enabling them to serve as math teacher leaders.
  • Mark LaBoe
    University Ministry/Student Affairs

    2015 – $50,000 from the Council of Independent Colleges for the project, “Vincentian Values and Vision Initiative (V3) at DePaul University.” This project will enhance the student experience by introducing a broader range and greater number of students to the spiritual dimension of DePaul’s Vincentian mission.
  • James Stewart
    Adult, Veteran, and Commuter Student Affairs

    2015 – $6,000 from Endicott College for the project, “The Family Friendly Campus Toolkit,” which is a set of instruments and processes, developed by Endicott College, with which institutions of higher education can conduct an assessment of their services to undergraduate students with children and develop a plan for improving on-campus services for this population.
  • Enid Montague
    College of Computing and Digital Media

    2015 – $5,035 from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, via a subaward from Northwestern University, for the project, “EHR Based Medication Complete Communication Strategy to Promote Safe Opioid Use,” specifically the design of a follow-up survey to assess usability from multiple standpoints and a protocol for evaluating a range of systems factors.
  • Nesreen Akhtarkhavari
    College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences

    2015 – $14,924 from the Qatar Foundation International to continue the Chicago Arabic Teachers Council during the 2015-2016 academic year. The Council supports the K-12 Arabic teachers in Chicagoland and neighboring states.
  • Charles H. Wurtzebach
    Driehaus College of Business

    2015 – $40,000 from the Polk Brothers Foundation for “Technical Assistance and Research on the 606 Trail and Beyond.” This project will help key stakeholders understand the impact of the new 606 Trail on the surrounding area's housing market.
  • Alberto Coll
    College of Law

    2015 – $2,000 from the Jack Miller Center for the“Constitution Day American Exceptionalism Debate” between University of Virginia Professor James Ceaser and Professor Alberto R. Coll on the topic of American Exceptionalism.
  • Donna Kiel
    College of Education

    2015 – The Office of Innovative Professional Learning will provide St. Theresa Catholic School with DePaul faculty expertise for the purpose of curriculum development, consultation, and mentoring aligned with the strategic goals of the school.