Ask an Expert

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Bioethicist shares perspective on university's approach to health monitoring

Bioethicist shares perspective on university's approach to health monitoring

​Craig Klugman, a professor of bioethics and health humanities in the College of Science and Health, has been involved with DePaul's COVID-19 response efforts since the university moved courses and most operations online in the spring. In this interview, he shares some of this thoughts on DePaul's approach to h​ealth monitoring.​

DePaul faculty discuss 100th anniversary of women’s suffrage

DePaul faculty discuss 100th anniversary of women’s suffrage

​The 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution guaranteeing women the right to vote was ratified by the states Aug. 18, 1920. During the 100th anniversary year of women’s suffrage, DePaul faculty Christina Rivers and Amy Tyson sat down with Newsline to discuss the significance of the movement, its relevance today, and the work still left to be done.

Professor talks fandoms, virtual engagement in a time of social distancing

Professor talks fandoms, virtual engagement in a time of social distancing

​Fandoms have played a pivotal role in Paul Booth’s professional and personal lives. A professor of media and cinema studies in the College of Communication, his research focuses on fandoms, games, technology, new media, and popular and cultural studies.​

Public health expert on disparities of coronavirus and African Americans

Public health expert on disparities of coronavirus and African Americans

​More African Americans are dying of COVID-19 in Chicago than any other racial group, according to data released this week by the Chicago Department of Public Health. This disparity reflects what public health researcher Daniel Schober has found in his own work in the city. Schober, an assistant professor of public health in the College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences, discusses the causes of health inequality for African Americans before and during this pandemic. ​

Supply chain expert on mitigating COVID-19 disruption

Supply chain expert on mitigating COVID-19 disruption

Supply chains affect many facets of our lives, from empty toilet paper aisles to a lack of facemasks for healthcare workers. Nezih Altay, a professor and director of the M.S. in Supply Chain Management in the Driehaus College of Business, researches humanitarian supply chains. In this Q and A, Altay explains how supply chains are disrupted and what makes pandemics a different sort of disaster. ​

DePaul virologist offers insight on coronavirus

DePaul virologist offers insight on coronavirus

As corona​virus continues to spread around the world, DePaul’s Sarah Connolly, associate professor in health sciences and biological sciences whose research focuses on viruses, sheds light on the mechanics of the virus and what the campus community can do.

DePaul Art Museum strives to provide space for new and underserved artists

DePaul Art Museum strives to provide space for new and underserved artists

​Julie Rodrigues Widholm first visited DePaul Art Museum in 2011 as a patron and left impressed by its exhibitions featuring contemporary art by Chicago-based artists. Four years later, she walked through the doors again as the museum’s director and chief curator. Since her arrival, she’s worked to amplify and integrate the museum’s mission into the larger context of the university, with a goal of providing exhibition space to new and underserved artists, including women, artists of color and LGBTQ artists.​

DePaul paleobiologist aids in discovery, naming of dinosaur-era shark fossil

DePaul paleobiologist aids in discovery, naming of dinosaur-era shark fossil

​A 91-million-year-old fossil shark, newly named 'Cretodus houghtonorum,' was discovered and excavated at a ranch near Tipton, Kansas, by DePaul faculty member Kenshu Shimada and his team of researchers. 

Political marketing researcher eyes branding in lead-up to 2020 presidential election

Political marketing researcher eyes branding in lead-up to 2020 presidential election

​With U.S. President Donald Trump’s reelection campaign underway and more than 20 candidates vying to be the Democratic standard bearer, how the sides market themselves is more important than ever in a politically-fractured country, says Bruce Newman, a marketing professor in the Driehaus College of Business.

Communicating climate change with journalism assistant professor Jill Hopke

Communicating climate change with journalism assistant professor Jill Hopke

​From frigid cold in the Midwestern U.S. to melting heat in Australia, extreme weather and climate change are making news around the world. Yet, the topic of climate change continues to be politicized, and journalists often struggle to cover it in a way that’s accurate and evidence-based, according to Jill Hopke, an assistant professor of journalism in the College of Communication.​

Slavery in early Illinois: The untold battle to keep the state free

Slavery in early Illinois: The untold battle to keep the state free

​The call to make Illinois a slave state in the early 1820s failed in large part to a pair of English settlers who founded the southern Illinois town of Albion the same year the state was chartered, says Caroline Kisiel, an assistant professor in DePaul’s School for New Learning.​

A conversation about equal rights with political scientist Valerie Johnson

A conversation about equal rights with political scientist Valerie Johnson

​While the U.S. civil rights movement is often said to have ended in 1968, the continued fight for equal rights for all Americans can be seen in today’s protests, says Valerie Johnson, an associate professor and chair of DePaul’s Political Science Department in the College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences.​

Understanding procrastination with psychology professor Joseph Ferrari

Understanding procrastination with psychology professor Joseph Ferrari

​It’s hard to imagine piles of clutter strewn about researcher Joseph Ferrari’s house or office. The professor of psychology knows the risks associated with that after spending much of his career studying and publishing on the topic of procrastination. Now in new research, Ferrari has discovered that an overabundance of “stuff” can have a detrimental effect on a person’s mental health and disrupt their sense of home.​

Inside the Supreme Court with political scientist Joseph Mello

Inside the Supreme Court with political scientist Joseph Mello

​The Supreme Court appears poised to shift to the right if Congress confirms U.S. Circuit Judge Brett Kavanaugh for a position on the highest court. If chosen, some conservatives are hoping Kavanaugh will join other conservative-leaning judges in reversing several landmark court decisions, sending the issues back to the states to decide on, says Joseph Mello, an assistant professor of political science in the College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences.​

School of Nursing poised to meet industry changes

School of Nursing poised to meet industry changes

​The Illinois health care industry is on the precipice of how care is provided, due in part to recent amendments to the Nurse Practice Act. In this Q&A, Matthew Sorenson, director of DePaul University's School of Nursing, explains some of the factors affecting industry change and DePaul's role in finding solutions.

Game designer says medium can provide empathy, dialogue and increased self-awareness

Game designer says medium can provide empathy, dialogue and increased self-awareness

​Video games can be used for more than just entertainment, they can also help raise awareness for mental illness and diseases, says Doris C. Rusch, an associate professor of game design in the School of Design. In this Q&A, Rusch explains why this medium is so important, how games can be an avenue for healing and what she hopes her games will accomplish once released.

Rural midwest culture as art

Rural midwest culture as art

​Zachary Ostrowski sees more than strip malls, car washes and other fragments of small town life when he travels through the rural Midwest. He sees art. Read on to learn more about how Ostrowski strives to preserve that art through performance, graffiti and video.

Jocelyn Carter discusses gun violence, youth and stress

Jocelyn Carter discusses gun violence, youth and stress

​​Pediatric psychologist Jocelyn Carter feels a personal connection to teens impacted by gun violence, from Parkland, Florida, to the neighborhoods of Chicago. In this Q&A, Carter discusses the impact stress has on young survivors of gun violence and offers advice for adults who are talking with teenagers and children about gun violence.​

Can books boost children's environmental literacy?

Can books boost children's environmental literacy?

​How can favorite children's books teach valuable lessons about nature and the environment? As a father and an environmental scientist, Liam Heneghan takes on this question in his new book, "Beasts at Bedtime: Revealing Environmental Wisdom in Children's Literature." Heneghan set out to create a curriculum for parents and teachers, but what he discovered, he says, was much more interesting.

Despite euphoric 2017, this year's stock market volatility not out of ordinary

Despite euphoric 2017, this year's stock market volatility not out of ordinary

​Jim Valentine, a clinical professor of finance in the Driehaus College of Business, believes that after a booming 2017 on Wall Street, the volatility the markets have shown so far in 2018 is not unusual. In this Q&A, Valentine explains the recent volatility in the market, how new tariffs affect it and what people should know before investing.​

Understanding the buzz behind Bitcoin, cryptocurrency and fintech

Understanding the buzz behind Bitcoin, cryptocurrency and fintech

When bitcoin's price peaked at nearly $18,000 in December 2017, it generated a buzz among DePaul's faculty and students, who are... read more

March Madness: Math department's Jeff Bergen talks longshot odds of picking perfect bracket

March Madness: Math department's Jeff Bergen talks longshot odds of picking perfect bracket

​As college basketball fans get ready for March Madness, mathematics professor Jeff Bergen offers some perspective on the odds of creating the perfect bracket - roughly a one in 9.2 quintillion chance to correctly pick the results of all of the games. Read on to learn more about the longshot odds and some ways to "improve" your chances.​

Blair Davis: Comic book expert who calls 'Black Panther' a 'cultural milestone' for genre

Blair Davis: Comic book expert who calls 'Black Panther' a 'cultural milestone' for genre

Part of the reason Marvel's "Black Panther" has seen so much success is that it came along at the right time both... read more

Michael Lewanski: Conducting cultural connection and change

Michael Lewanski: Conducting cultural connection and change

​After studying at the St. Petersburg Conservatory, the School of Music's Michael Lewanski now conducts the DePaul Concert Orchestra and DePaul’s Ensemble 20+. Read on to learn how he teaches students to invite change in music, rethink the world around them and set the tone for culture to come.​

The perfect bracket: Mathematician talks longshot odds of predicting March Madness

The perfect bracket: Mathematician talks longshot odds of predicting March Madness

​As college basketball fans get set to fill out their brackets for this year's March Madness, mathematics professor Jeff Bergen offers some perspective on the odds of creating the perfect bracket. It's more likely, says Bergen, to predict the winning party in the next 62 presidential elections through the year 2264 than to pick all 63 games correctly in this year's NCAA men's basketball tournament.

Public service scholars collaborate on policy journal for Illinois Municipal Leaders

Public service scholars collaborate on policy journal for Illinois Municipal Leaders

​Local government leaders grappling with issues facing their communities will have the benefit of academic research and information on best practices in a new journal published by the Illinois Municipal League in collaboration with DePaul's School of Public Service.

Cutting through the clutter

Cutting through the clutter

​The phrase "make yourself at home" seems perfectly innocuous, but there is a significant psychological element to doing so that few people may consider.