Teaching Commons > Teaching Guides > Course Design > The Syllabus

The Syllabus

This guide begins with DePaul syllabus requirements, templates, and examples:

The rest of the guide contains other tools and recommendations for creating inclusive and effective syllabuses: 

A syllabus is a map.

Twenty years ago, many instructors would have described the syllabus as a “table of contents” or, alternatively, a “contract.” Today’s books on college teaching and course design are likely to draw on different metaphors: the syllabus is a map or travelogue, as it both describes the intended destination and explains why one might want to go in the first place (Nilson, 27).

The most effective syllabus goes beyond listing the logistics and the topics covered in the course – it (a) articulates the conceptual framework for the course; (b) introduces students to the key questions or problems facing experts in the field; (c) suggests the ways in which an understanding of the course subject matters; (d) establishes an inclusive learning environment; (e) identifies the specific skills and knowledge students will be able to demonstrate upon completion of the course.

Typical elements of a syllabus include:

  • Course information (course title, quarter, your name)
  • Contact information including your office location, phone number, and email address (some instructors also choose to include their pronouns
  • Course description and prerequisites
  • Student learning outcomes
  • Required materials
  • Assigned work
  • A calendar or events including lecture topics, assigned work, and special announcements (due dates should include the timezone to prevent confusion)
  • Participation guidelines 
  • Grading policies and rubrics when appropriate
  • Course policies and student/teacher expectations (attendance, participation, tardiness, academic integrity, missing homework, missed exams)
  • Campus resources 
  • Advice to students

Required Information for DePaul Syllabuses

According to the DePaul Faculty Handbook (Faculty Rights and Responsibilities, p. 6) all syllabuses should contain the following information at a minimum:

  1. A rationale for the course stated in the context of the aims of the department and/or division;
  2. A statement on the types of instruction (i.e., lecture; lecture-discussion; lab, etc.);
  3. Specific materials required for the course (books, pamphlets, library materials, etc.);
  4. Proposed major and minor topics to be covered in the course;
  5. Specific required readings, and written and oral assignments (inclusion of tentative dates for such assignments is desirable);
  6. Specific descriptions of the criteria and methods (i.e., nature of quizzes and examinations) to be used by the instructor in evaluating students’ academic performance;
  7. Statement on academic integrity;
  8. Instructor’s office number and office hours for the term in which the course is being offered.

Example Syllabus Statements

​A detailed discussion of attendance and late work policies requires​ its own page.

Keeping our DePaul community safe is of utmost importance in the pandemic. Students, faculty and staff are expected to (1) wear a mask as required at all times while indoors on campus; (2) refrain from eating and drinking in classrooms; (3) keep current with their COVID-19 vaccinations or exemptions; (4) stay home if sick; (5) participate in any required COVID-19 testing; (6) complete the online Health and Safety Guidelines for Returning to Campus training; and (7) abide by the City of Chicago Emergency Travel Advisory. By doing these things, we are Taking Care of DePaul, Together. The recommendations may change as local, state, and federal guidelines evolve. Students who do not abide by the mask requirement may be subject to the student conduct process and will be referred to the Dean of Students Office. Students who have a medical reason for not complying with any requirements should register with DePaul’s Center for Student with Disabilities (CSD).

Students seeking disability-related accommodations are required to register with DePaul's Center for Students with Disabilities (CSD) enabling you to access accommodations and support services to assist your success. There are two office locations:

Loop Campus - Lewis Center #1420 - (312) 362-8002

Lincoln Park Campus - Student Center #370 - (773) 325-1677

Students can also email the office at csd@depaul.edu

Students who are registered with the Center for Students with Disabilities are also invited to contact me privately to discuss how I may assist in facilitating the accommodations you will use in this course. This is best done early in the term. Our conversation will remain confidential to the extent possible.


Taken from the Center for Students with Disabilities.

DePaul University is a learning community that fosters the pursuit of knowledge and the transmission of ideas within a context that emphasizes a sense of responsibility for oneself, for others and for society at large. Violations of academic integrity, in any of their forms, are, therefore, detrimental to the values of DePaul, to the students’ own development as responsible members of society, and to the pursuit of knowledge and the transmission of ideas. Violations include but are not limited to the following categories: cheating; plagiarism; fabrication; falsification or sabotage of research data; destruction or misuse of the university’s academic resources; alteration or falsification of academic records; and academic misconduct. Conduct that is punishable under the Academic Integrity Policy could result in additional disciplinary actions by other university officials and possible civil or criminal prosecution. Please refer to your Student Handbook or visit Academic Integrity at DePaul University (http://academicintegrity.depaul.edu) for further details.


For more example syllabus statements, including abbreviated versions and versions highlighting areas of concern such as cheating and plagiarism, visit the Academic Integrity website.

I strongly recommend you make use of the Writing Center throughout your time at DePaul. The Writing Center provides free peer writing tutoring for DePaul students, faculty, staff, and alumni. Writing Center tutors work with writers at all stages of the writing process, from invention to revision, and they are trained to identify recurring issues in your writing as well as address any specific questions or areas that you want to talk about. Visit www.depaul.edu/writing for more information.


For a more comprehensive statement you can use, visit the Writing Center’s website.

The Dean of Students Office (DOS) promotes student learning and ethical decision making in an inclusive and validating environment. Utilizing a comprehensive approach to student advocacy that is informed by DePaul’s Catholic, Vincentian, and urban mission, the office collaborates with students, staff, faculty, parents and community partners to support students in reaching their academic and personal success.
 
The Dean of Students Office is primarily responsible for administering and adjudicating violations of the Code of Student Responsibility at DePaul University. Additionally, the office provides the administrative withdrawal and absence notification process, and can help students identify campus and community resources in times of personal and/or family crises and medical emergencies. 

DePaul University Counseling Services (UCS) is committed to providing a range of culturally aware and sensitive clinical services to help currently enrolled DePaul students remove barriers to academic and personal success by addressing emotional, psychological, and interpersonal concerns through multiple treatment modalities. Services offered include: group counseling, individual counseling, couples counseling, crisis management, consultation, referrals, and telereach/outreach workshops. All services are currently being offered on a virtual, remote basis with no fees due to COVID-19. To connect with the counseling center, contact our main number at (773) 325-7779 during regular business hours (Monday-Friday, 9am-5pm) to schedule an initial consultation, which is typically scheduled within 1-2 business days of your call.

If you need more immediate assistance or are in acute distress, you can call the main number during regular business hours and ask to speak with a counselor. If you are experiencing a life-threatening emergency, call 911 or go to your nearest emergency room. The Counseling Services staff has extensive experience with providing support services to individuals of varying social identities and backgrounds. Further, our counselors know that commitment to diversity, inclusivity, and anti-racism is an ongoing and open-ended journey and, as such, our counselors frequently and regularly engage in self-reflection and training opportunities to increase cultural awareness and to challenge one’s own privileges and biases. 

As a DePaul community, we share a commitment to take care of one another. Classroom relationships are based on trust and communication. Sometimes, material raised in class may bring up issues for students related to sexual and relationship violence. In other instances, students may reach out to faculty as a source of help and support. It is important for students to know that faculty are required to report information reported to them about experiences with sexual or relationship violence to DePaul's Title IX Coordinator. Students should also know that disclosing experiences with sexual or relationship violence in course assignments or discussion does not constitute a formal report to the University and may not begin the process of DePaul providing a response. Students seeking to report an incident of sexual or relationship violence to DePaul should contact Public Safety (Lincoln Park: 773-325-7777; Loop: 312-362-8400) and/or the Title IX Coordinator (Lincoln Park: 312-362-8970 or titleixcoordinator@depaul.edu). Students seeking to speak confidentially about issues related to sexual and relationship violence should contact a Survivor Support Advocate in the Office of Health Promotion & Wellness for information and resources (773-325-7129 or hpw@depaul.edu). More information is available at http://studentaffairs.depaul.edu/hpw/shvp.html. Students are encouraged to take advantage of these services and to seek help around sexual and relationship violence for themselves as well as their peers who may be in need of support.

Professional courtesy and sensitivity are especially important with respect to individuals and topics dealing with differences of race, culture, religion, politics, sexual orientation, gender, gender variance, and nationalities. I will gladly honor your request to address you by an alternate name or gender pronoun. Please advise me of this preference early in the quarter so that I may make appropriate changes to my records. Please also note that students may choose to identify within the University community with a preferred first name that differs from their legal name and may also update their gender. The preferred first name will appear in University related systems and documents except where the use of the legal name is necessitated or required by University business or legal need. For more information and instructions on how to do so, please see the Student Preferred Name and Gender Policy at policies.depaul.edu.

The Office of Health Promotion & Wellness (HPW) empowers the DePaul community to embrace a healthy lifestyle and is dedicated to creating a culture of health and well-being that fosters personal and academic success for every DePaul student.    

HPW empowers DePaul students, staff and faculty members to 'Take Care DePaul' through holistic education, support, and resources for individuals to establish and sustain long-term, healthy behaviors. HPW provides services and programs on mental well-being, sexual and relationship violence, alcohol and substance misuse and many more topics. The office consists of professional staff members and the Health Education Action Team (HEAT), which consists of a group of trained undergraduate peer health educators.     

In light of the COVID-19 impact on the University, the Office of Health Promotion and Wellness programs and services will continue and can be accessible to students remotely. Students can meet with a staff member via Zoom or telephone. Appointments can be requested by calling 773-325-7129 or completing this online intake form. Learn more by viewing our HPW Digital Brochure or visiting our website go.depaul.edu/HPW.

Respect for Diversity and Inclusion at DePaul University as aligned with our Vincentian Values

At DePaul, our mission calls us to explore “what must be done” in order to respect the inherent dignity and identity of each human person. We value diversity because it is part of our history, our traditions, and our future. We see diversity as an asset and a strength that adds to the richness of classroom learning. In my course, I strive to include diverse authors, perspectives and teaching pedagogies. I also encourage open dialogue and spaces for students to express their unique identities and perspectives. I am open to having difficult conversations and I will strive to create an inclusive classroom that values all perspectives. If at any time the classroom experience does not live up to this expectation, please feel free to contact me via email or during office hours.  

The above statement was drafted by the President's Diversity Advisory Committee (PDAC). Please refer to a guide developed by PDAC that includes more considerations and example statements.

Your success is our number one priority at DePaul University. University resources to help you succeed include computer labs, free or discounted software, tutoring centers, health services, and services for designated groups, such as veterans and students with disabilities. Visit go.depaul.edu/success to learn more.

This class will use Zoom, a video conferencing tool, for instruction and/or collaboration. Students should follow general guidelines and meet participation expectations for Zoom meetings.

General Guidelines

    • Use your given or preferred name as your display name.
    • Don’t use distracting or inappropriate profile photos or virtual backgrounds.
    • Don’t share meeting links, passwords, screenshots, recordings, or other meeting information with people outside the class.
    • Mute your microphone when you’re not speaking to minimize background noise.
    • If connectivity issues impact your audio/video quality, try turning off your camera.

Contact DePaul’s Technology Support Center at 312.362.8765 if you need assistance during a video call.

Participation Expectations

      • Be on time or notify your instructor if you will be late or unable to attend.
      • Minimize distractions, such as televisions and cell phones, when possible.
      • Don’t engage in other activities during sessions (driving, cooking, cleaning, etc.)
      • Try to put your device at eye level on a solid surface. Holding your device or placing it in your lap can add movement to your video, which can be distracting.
      • If you think you might have trouble actively participating in meetings, let your instructor know in advance, if possible.

Please note: Students should report any incidents of behavioral misconduct (including harassment) in video conference meetings to their instructor. Any incident of harassment and/or behavioral misconduct that impedes the teaching & learning environment may be reported to the Dean of Students Office for referral to the student conduct process. This includes sharing meeting links, passwords, screenshots, recordings, or other meeting information in a way that could facilitate harassment or misconduct by others.

Camera Use During Zoom Meetings

It’s much easier for us to feel connected as a class and build a sense of community if we can see and hear each other. While I don’t require students to have their cameras on at all times, having your camera on during class meetings is strongly encouraged. During our meetings, I’ll do my best to indicate if there are times when you don’t need to have your camera on. I’ll also provide a heads up if there will be times when it’s particularly important that all participants have their cameras and microphones on (during a small-group discussion activity, for instance). 

Camera-Related Concerns

For some students, having cameras on during class meetings may be a source of stress, for them or for others with whom they share their space. Internet bandwidth limitations can also make it difficult for some students to fully participate in meetings at times. If you have experienced these issues, please review the tips below. If you’re still concerned about camera use or participation expectations in general after reviewing these guidelines, please contact me so we can identify potential solutions.

Workarounds and Accomodations

    • Be proactive. If you won’t be able to use your camera or microphone during an upcoming meeting, please email me beforehand so I’m aware. This helps me know if participation levels might be lower than usual so I can plan accordingly.   
    • Consider using a virtual background. If you have concerns about sharing your space, feel free to use a virtual background if your device supports this feature. When choosing a virtual background please avoid images or videos that are overly distracting or inappropriate for a class setting.
    • Add an image to your Zoom profile. For moments when you aren’t able to use your camera, it’s helpful if your classmates and I can see a visual representation of you instead of just your name. By adding a photo to your Zoom profile, we’ll be able to put a face with your name even if you need to turn your camera off temporarily. Ideally, your Zoom profile photo should be relatively professional (selfies are fine) and show your face clearly. If you have reservations about adding a photo to Zoom, let me know so that we can discuss your concerns and find a possible alternative. 

Instructor and course evaluations provide valuable feedback that can improve teaching and learning. The greater the level of participation, the more useful the results. As students, you are in the unique position to view the instructor over time. Your comments about what works and what doesn't can help faculty build on the elements of the course that are strong and improve those that are weak. Isolated comments from students and instructors’ peers may also be helpful, but evaluation results based on high response rates may be statistically reliable. As you experience this course and material, think about how your learning is impacted.


Your honest opinions about your experience in and commitment to the course and your learning may help improve some components of the course for the next group of students. Positive comments also show the department chairs and college deans the commitment of instructors to the university and teaching evaluation results are one component used in annual performance reviews (including salary raises and promotion/tenure). The evaluation of the instructor and course provides you an opportunity to make your voice heard on an important issue – the quality of teaching at DePaul. Don't miss this opportunity to provide feedback!


Developed by the Driehaus College of Business.

The Help Desk provides technical assistance via phone, email and web for current DePaul students, faculty and staff. The Help Desk supports computers, network access, telephones, email accounts, and university instructional and administrative software. They can troubleshoot and resolve hardware and software related issues with both the Mac and Windows operating systems. Visit https://depaul.service-now.com/sp to get help.

The DePaul Career Center helps students build confidence, explore possibilities, and develop a powerful personal brand. We offer resume and cover letter review, skills assessments, career exploration and pathway conversations, assistance with internship and job searches, interview preparation, access to alumni mentors, employer insights workshops, career fairs, and many more experiential opportunities to prepare for your future. It’s never too early to begin exploring! Start your personal and professional journey here: careercenter.depaul.edu.

While in the classroom, internet-enabled devices such as laptops, tablets, smartphones, and smartwatches can ONLY be used for the purpose of learning as required by the instructor. No texting, emailing, or web browsing is allowed in the classroom. Violation will result in losing all of the 10% class performance grade.

DePaul students, faculty and staff have free unlimited access to LinkedIn Learning, which offers a large library of video tutorials across a range of topics, from how to use popular software titles such as Adobe Creative Suite and Microsoft Office to practical advice on saving time and being productive. Visit bit.ly/dpu-linkedin to learn more.

Students placed at community organizations that work with minors (under 18 years of age) are required to complete the Illinois Mandated Reporter training designed to help them understand the state mandated reporter laws and requirements for recognizing and reporting child abuse. Training must be completed prior to beginning service at the site. Students should complete the mandated reporter training in D2L by week two of the quarter.

Example Statements for Flex Teaching

The following example syllabus statements have been crafted specifically for Flex modalities:

Synchronous sessions are best for sessions that involve time for active learning activities where students interact with you and one another. 

Example Statement 

We will use the synchronous class sessions to engage in activities and exercises that will help you to apply what you're learning and to engage with your peers. The synchronous sessions will be best utilized and most lively if everyone has prepared by watching the assigned lectures, reading the assigned texts, and completing any individual assignments or activities I've assigned earlier in the week. A portion of the synchronous session will also be reserved for questions and answers. 

This synchronous class sessions or portions of synchronous class sessions will be recorded and available to the class during the quarter via our D2L course site. You may find it helpful to review these recordings, but watching the recordings will not be a substitute for attending and participating in the synchronous sessions. Portions of the recordings that contain images, questions, or commentary/discussion by students will be edited out of any recordings that are saved beyond the current quarter. 

All faculty are required to verify student attendance in the beginning of the quarter, per DePaul policy and federal financial aid guidelines. Beyond that, how will you approach attendance? 

And regardless of your attendance policy, make your synchronous sessions worthwhile. Break up lectures into smaller increments and build in time for other learning activities, such as small group work.  

Example Statement

Your attendance will be measured by your attendance of the synchronous class sessions. 

Much learning happens while working with peers, discussion, and participation in a community. These are learning experiences that are almost impossible to make up individually. If you have concerns about your ability to attend synchronous class sessions this quarter, please reach out to me via email to discuss your concerns.

What does active participation look like in your course? Will you assign a grade for it? How will that be determined?

In order to increase the likelihood of students' participation, work toward establishing a welcoming and inclusive environment with your students. Use icebreakers to get people talking and continue engaging students personally throughout the quarter.  

Example Statement 

This is a class in which participation (in a variety of forms) is key to developing your skills and knowledge. Your participation during the synchronous sessions will also help us to build our classroom community. Your participation grade will be determined by your engagement with synchronous class discussions and activities, asynchronous discussion forums, responses to short written assignments, and completion of knowledge check quizzes. 

Your participation in synchronous class sessions will be evaluated based on quality. I will ask you to participate in a variety of forms, including raising your hand and contributing via speaking, posting responses to the Zoom chat, and adding content to Google Docs that will be available via our D2L course site.

You'll earn 1 point for each class session if you 

  • Contribute unique ideas and personal examples when prompted 
  • Build on previous comments and contributions
  • Provide evidence and support for claims and ideas (especially evidence that is derived from our course texts and materials) 
  • Ask relevant questions that advance the discussion

All other participation grading guidelines are available as part of the individual activity and assignment instructions. 

You can ask or request that students to turn on their cameras during your synchronous sessions, but keep in mind that not all students have easy access to private spaces, reliable internet connections, or the best equipment. Encourage your students to use their camera, especially when speaking, but do not require it. Remind students to use their preferred first name, last name, and pronouns so you can easily identify them.

Example Syllabus Statement

It’s much easier for us to feel connected as a class and build a sense of community if we can see and hear each other. While I don’t require students to have their cameras on at all times, having your camera on during class meetings is strongly encouraged. During our meetings, I’ll do my best to indicate if there are times when you don’t need to have your camera on. I’ll also provide a heads up if there will be times when it’s particularly important that all participants have their cameras and microphones on (during a small-group discussion activity, for instance).

For some students, having cameras on during class meetings may be a source of stress. Internet bandwidth limitations can also make it difficult for some students to fully participate in meetings at times. If you have experienced these issues, please review the tips below. If you’re still concerned about camera use or participation expectations in general after reviewing these guidelines, please contact me so we can identify potential solutions.

Zoom Camera Workarounds and Accomodations

    • Be proactive. If you won’t be able to use your camera or microphone during an upcoming meeting, please email me beforehand so I’m aware. This helps me know if participation levels might be lower than usual so I can plan accordingly.   
    • Consider using a virtual background. If you have concerns about sharing your space, feel free to use a virtual background if your device supports this feature. When choosing a virtual background please avoid images or videos that are overly distracting or inappropriate for a class setting.
    • Add an image to your Zoom profile. For moments when you aren’t able to use your camera, it’s helpful if your classmates and I can see a visual representation of you instead of just your name. By adding a photo to your Zoom profile, we’ll be able to put a face with your name even if you need to turn your camera off temporarily. Ideally, your Zoom profile photo should be relatively professional (selfies are fine) and show your face clearly. If you have reservations about adding a photo to Zoom, let me know so that we can discuss your concerns and find a possible alternative. 

For students joining your classes on-campus, do they need to be bring a laptop/tablet and headphones in order to work with their colleagues joining the session remotely? While not all students have laptops or tablets, you can remind them of "Demon Discounts" on technology from Apple and Dell, among other vendors.

Example Syllabus Statement

While in the physical classroom, please consider bringing an internet-enabled device such as a laptop, tablet, or smartphone. You will use your device to easily access our class materials and to engage with your peers that are participating remotely. Please use your device for our learning activities and refrain from texting, emailing, and web browsing when in the classroom. While participating from the physical classroom, please do not join the Zoom meeting unless prompted in order to avoid audio feedback issues. 

Grading Scale and Policies

One of the requirements of a DePaul syllabus is "specific descriptions of the criteria and methods... to be used by the instructor in evaluating students’ academic performance." A common method employed by instructors is a grading scale.

The grading scale below is used by many faculty in a variety of disciplines at DePaul. However, some departments may use grading scales that differ somewhat from the one shown here. Consult with your chair if you have any concerns about whether your grading scale is consistent with the one used by other instructors in your department.

A: 93-100

A-: 90-92

B+: 87-89

B: 83-86

B-: 80-82

C+: 77-79

C: 73-76

C-: 70-72

D+: 67-69

D: 63-66

D-: 60-62

F: Below 60

In addition to a common grading scale, offer multiple opportunities for learning and assessment and describe the ways students can demonstrate their learning and understanding. Provide clear criteria for how students will be assessed and what feedback they can expect from you. Include a grading response time (e.g., I will grade and provide feedback on your work within one week of submission).

For more guidance on feedback and assessment, see Feedback and Grading.

Syllabus Templates and Examples

A syllabus template can help make the process of drafting a new syllabus easier. The following templates features of accessible document design. These features help to ensure that all students can easily navigate your syllabus and can use screen readers to read your syllabus.

The following template was adapted from Daniel Stanford's course on web design:

Face-to-Face Syllabus Example

Online Course Syllabus Examples

Accessible Document Design

These principles and features can help ensure you create a syllabus that is accessible:

  • Use headings
  • Use lists
  • Use meaningful hyperlinks
  • Add alternate text to images
  • Use tables wisely

The University of Washington has short and focused resources for creating accessible documents. See“Creating Accessible Documents in Microsoft Word” and  “Checking PDFs for Accessibility.” Finally, the National Center on Disability and Access to Education has guides for making documents in many programs (including Word, Excel, and PowerPoint) more accessible. See Document Accessibility Cheatsheets for the guides.

Inclusive Syllabus Tools 

Moore, Brantmeir, and Brocheild developed the Inclusion By Design: Survey Your Syllabus and Course Design tool to help educators examine inclusion in theirsyllabus and course design. As they describe, the tool is “rooted in theory and research on inclusion, multicultural education, universal design, implicit/unconscious bias, and the hidden curriculum.” The following reflection questions are taken from the tool: 

  • What is the course content? Whose voice is heard? What perspective dominates? What is omitted?
  • How is the content relevant in the “real” world and for the learners in your class? How can it be made relevant for those who may not recognize its relevance?
  • What are the implicit rules and messages of your course and are they stated in your syllabus?
  • What are the hidden/implicit/unconscious biases and stereotypes?

Duke University, as part of an accessible syllabus project, also has a set of resources for designing accessible syllabi.

Conceptual Framework and Value of Course

In its review of literature on cognition and learning, the National Resource Council found that "organizing information into a conceptual framework allows for greater 'transfer'; that is, it allows the student to apply what was learned in new situations and to learn related information more quickly" (17).

One way you can do this in your syllabus is by explicitly stating the specific skills and knowledge students will possess upon completing the course. Articulating clear and specific learning outcomes for students helps students grasp what is expected of them, measure their progress, and seek help in the areas that continue to elude them.

Consider  explaining to students how they might use what they learn in your course in their other classes or, better yet, in their everyday lives. For some suggested approaches, see The First Day of Class.

​Course Policy Framing 

Use your course policies to help establish a supportive learning environment. By using student-centered language that emphasizes achievements and goals rather than punitive measures, you can help signal your commitment to students’ learning, growth, and development. 

The following revision suggestions are adapted inclusive syllabus design resources available from University of Massachusetts at Amherst.

Emphasizes Punitive Measures
Emphasizes Achievements & Goals
Students must...
I encourage you to...
I only accept….
You have the opportunity to...
Late work will be penalized by….
Late work is eligible for partial credit of...
Unexcused absences will result in... Attendance is important because….
Students will face consequences if….
The following course policies will help you to learn because….

Degree Requirements

Informing your students of where the course fits in with their degree program and DePaul career as a whole helps create a sense of continuity and purpose.

Further Reading

Grunert, J. (1997). The course syllabus: A learning-centered approach. Bolton, MA: Anker Publishing.

Lockwood, A. (2020). “A ‘How to Write’ Craft Syllabus From Non-White, Non-Cis Writers.” Literary Hub.

Nilson, Linda. (2003). “The complete syllabus”. Teaching at its best: A research-based resource for college instructors. Bolton, MA: Anker Publishing Company.

Wasley, Paula. (2008). “Research Yields Tips on Crafting Better Syllabi.” The Chronicle of Higher Education, 54(27), A11.

Wasley, Paula. (2008). “The Syllabus Becomes a Repository of Legalese.” The Chronicle of Higher Education, 54(27), A1.

Write the Syllabus from Carnegie Mellon includes practical information on when to write a syllabus, general advice, and writing creative syllabi.